Category: Flower Arranging

Feb 22

Learn How To Dry Flowers

How To Dry Flowers (courtesy of Howcast.com)

Dried flowers make great decorations for your home and are perfect for making unique gifts. Spruce up your home with this fun and inexpensive hobby. You will need:

Pruning shears
Hangers
Dental floss
Rubber bands
Dark, warm and well-ventilated area
Hairspray

Step 1: Pick flowers for drying from early spring to late fall. Choose blooms that have not fully matured. The blooms will open as they dry.

Step 2: Choose healthy-looking flowers that are insect and disease free.

Step 3: Air dry the flowers. Cut the stems to no shorter than 6 inches in length and pull off any excess foliage.

Step 4: Tie the stems to a hanger with dental floss. Tie them individually or bunch the stems together with a rubber band.

Step 5: Allow the flowers to dry upside down in a dark, warm, and well-ventilated area for two to three weeks.

Step 6: Spray the flowers with hairspray after they are completely dry. Display your dried flowers around your home, keeping them out of sunny areas.

Did you know? No species of wild plant produces a flower or blossom that is absolutely black.

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Nov 19

Learn How To Arrange Flowers

Learn How To Arrange Flowers (courtesy of Howdini.com)

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Apr 01

Wedding How-To – French Spiral Bouquet

How To Make A French Spiral Wedding Bouquet (courtesy of DominoMag.com)

Today, we’re going to learn how to make a traditional french style bouquet. We’re gonna be using all one flower. We chose roses just because they’re simple, straight-stemmed flowers, and also, because they’re beautiful!

So, the first thing that you want to do is you want to clean all of the foliage and the thorns, in this case because of the roses, off of your flower. You don’t want to have the foliage under water. It creates bacteria and just doesn’t look very clean or nice.

So, take a heavy cloth or bath rag, maybe something canvas or a gardening glove, and just really strip straight down and just pull them off. You want to get a vase full of water ready, and you’d like to probably have some raffia, which we have, or string or ribbon – something that you’re gonna use to bind your finished bouquet.

Okay, you want to slowly choose flowers, and you’re gonna be crossing your stems. This is gonna be our base flower, and you’re gonna slowly cross your stems to start with the center, that’s going to be round and mounded from the middle, and it will slowly spiral out. So, you’re gonna come out with a sort of perfect, half-ball shape, once you’re finished. And, you just want to turn it, always holding with your thumb and pointer finger. I’m just making this really, simple pattern, which is allowing a lot of space around each flower and showing off every one individually.

It’s important to look at it from all different angles. As you can see, I’m sort of making it heavy on this side, so what I do is just sort of turn it around – it can be scary, but you can do it – and sort of just work from that other side.

As you can see here, I have nicely, spiraled stems, and I’m holding it with my thumb and pointer finger as I started out. You want to take your raffia and use your pointer finger to help. You wanna hold that pretty taut, and you want to just wrap it around a couple times – just tight, as you’re holding it – because this is gonna be the anchor that’s gonna keep your flowers in place. So I’ve wound this around – and you want to tie just like a double knot. Nothing fancy – just like you were tying your own shoe. You wanna make sure that it’s not gonna get untied and not gonna go anywhere. It’s a little tricky…you can lean it against your body or do what you need to do. So, we have our scissors here, I’ll just cut that down short.

So, we’re almost done with our lovely, round bouquet. My vase is all ready with the water in it, and, we’re gonna cut this relatively short – probably shorter than you would think. And, you know, you can sort of bring your vase up and figure out, sort of eyeball, where you think you should be cutting it. We’re gonna just cut some stems – you wanna just cut straight across, and this will be resting on it. If you give it a cut on an angle, they have much more of a surface area to drink from.

And, what’s important – with roses especially – but, a lot of flowers that have these – these are nodes from where the leaves were growing out – you always want to cut above it or just below it. But, I’m gonna continue to cut these straight across, and you just want to guide it in there, give it a little tap and poke, and there we have our pretty french, round bouquet – viola!

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